Press on… Calvin Coolidge

CalvinCoolidge Press on quote

Nothing can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; there’s nothing more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘press on‘ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race. Calvin Coolidge

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Midnight Motivation: The Not Yet

Napoleon Hill quote

It can be easy to give into failure and to be discouraged by road blocks, but the truth is, every ‘no’ is one step closer to a ‘yes’ and every ‘no’ is actually a ‘not yet’. J.K Rowling’s Harry Potter was turned down by 12 publishers before it was picked up by Bloomsbury. Similarly, 27 publishers  rejected Dr Seuss’s first book To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street. Steven Spielberg was declined from the University of Southern California’s film school twice. Walt Disney was told he “lacked imagination and had no good ideas” and Albert Einstein allegedly didn’t learn to speak until aged four. Those who we admire and who carry great success have been rejected, fired, replaced, insulted and deemed incapable. What if they had given up, been defeated and resorted to something else? Our culture wouldn’t be the same. We need to start looking at our setbacks as steps forward rather than backwards. Don’t deprive yourself and the world of your success. You can achieve greatness as long as you pursue, persist and persevere. Keep your chin up.

Every adversity, every failure and every heartache carries with it the seed of an equivalent greater benefit – Napoleon Hill

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Midnight Motivation: Have to or Want to?

never-give-up-on-what-you-really-want-to-do-jackson-brown

If we strip down the problem of maintaining our motivation, it often comes down the whether we associate the journey to our goals with having to or wanting to.

First, we have the external demands of society and the people around us. We feel like we have to act a certain way or look a certain way. But when have we ever felt passionate or enthusiastic about something when someone is telling us what to do? Can we create passion and enthusiasm for something we don’t want to do? Sometimes when we feel like we need to be skinnier or we need to eat healthier because of what others are telling us, we are constantly focused on the lack – the lack of being skinny or the lack of being healthier – that we find in ourselves. We don’t focus on the journey, we only look at the end goal and how far we are from it. And the motivation levels dissipate rapidly.

Next, we have our internal demands. Sometimes this comes later on in the motivation journey, where we find ourselves losing the inspiration we had at the beginning, and now everything seems like a chore. In this case, we focus too highly on the length and the struggle of the journey and lose sight of the end goal and the importance of such a journey. Again, we’re looking at the negative aspect of how far there is to go instead of enjoying it. And the motivation levels plummet.

But ultimately, we have to find the journey and the process important enough, so that we don’t give up. And that importance will only come from love and pleasure. We won’t ever have motivation for something that doesn’t make us happy. We have to want that end goal, not have to have that end goal. Those who want something will always find the drive to obtain it, because it isn’t something that has been handed to them or dictated to them; it is something they yearn for. It is a dream they will strive for no matter what. Find the motivation through love rather than obligation, through desire rather than necessity.